10 Comrades Marathons in 10 days

I had been waiting for weeks for a chance to chat to Hazel, who is juggling a job, a family, running seriously insane distances and her life’s passion – rescuing dogs. Hazel is someone I look up to and have the world’s respect for.  I was so nervous to call her, fearing that I would […]

I had been waiting for weeks for a chance to chat to Hazel, who is juggling a job, a family, running seriously insane distances and her life’s passion – rescuing dogs.

Hazel is someone I look up to and have the world’s respect for.  I was so nervous to call her, fearing that I would make a complete fool of myself.  let’s call it a run-crush.  As agreed, I called her at 6:29pm (Australian time), and a chirpy voice answered “Jeez Anna you are punctual”.  (We had agreed on 6:30pm and I can’t stand being late).  I immediately burst out laughing and responded “Yes, I could have been German!”.  I knew we were going to get along just fine.

Hazel had just run her first trail race, and when Hazel does something, she goes all in.  She didn’t opt for (what would have been to her) a short distance of about 30-50 km’s.  She went straight in for the kill – a 100mile trail run.  I could hear the disappointment in her voice when she told me how bad it went, and how she got hypothermia, passed out and had to be carried down the mountain.  She was deeply grateful to a gent named Andrew for carrying her down the mountain.

Shivers ran down my spine.  Not only do I remember when I got hypothermia in chilly Pietermaritzburg at the end of the Comrades Marathon in 2015 (which was promptly followed by my mother ripping my clothes off wrapping me in anything she could find, in the process accidentally stealing a blanket from the TUKS tent which we returned), but I distinctly remember how out of control and scared I felt, amidst my husband, mom and about 100 000 other people.   Hazel was alone, and I was very grateful that she was found. A small part of me did giggle a bit thinking ‘if it were me I would have been dead as I would have been last, but since Hazel runs like a machine she is guaranteed to always have people behind her!”.

Who is this mad woman, you may ask?  Hazel Moller is the heart and soul behind ten10.  Not Ben10, ten10 (although Ben10 is almost as cool!).  In short, it means that Hazel (and any other person that is up for the challenge that year), runs 10 Comrades Marathons in 10 days, with day 10 being the actual grueling Comrades Marathon race itself.  The Comrades Marathon was the first ultra marathon in the world, and is renowned for it’s incredibly difficult course covering 89km’s, 12 hour cut-off time and hills – many named, and many unnamed.

Over the coming months I will be sharing the inspirational story of one woman, backed by an amazing family, supporters and 3 other amazing women who loves doing good and rescuing dogs, with the sole purpose of creating awareness for the ten10 campaign as they raise much needed funds for animal rescue in South Africa

Follow this extremely difficult and noble cause on Facebook or on Twitter.

 

Hazel reflecting with gratitude on how every step and pinch of pain was worth it to ensure that the animal shelter had food.
Hazel reflecting with gratitude on how every step and pinch of pain was worth it to ensure that the animal shelter had food.
Companions are encouraged to join part of the ten10 route, or the entire one!
Companions are encouraged to join part of the ten10 route, or the entire one!
Companions are encouraged to join part of the ten10 route, or the entire one!
Companions are encouraged to join part of the ten10 route, or the entire one!

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